Bookworm  
Bookworm for Kids

   
These new books are highly recommended for home and school libraries.

New Books for Younger Kids

Preaching to the ChickensPreaching to the Chickens: The Story of Young John Lewis
by Jabari Asim, E.B. Lewis
Ages 5–8
Young John Lewis wants to be a preacher when he grows up, and when given the task of caring for his family’s flock of chickens decides to practice his sermons. The chickens are the prefect congregation, docile, attentive, and responsive to his voice. An author’s note fills in the later life of the future civil rights activist: a member of the Freedom Riders, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, demonstrator on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, and currently a Georgia congressman.

Step Right UpStep Right Up: How Doc and Jim Key Taught the World about Kindness
by Donna Janell Bowman, Daniel Minter
Ages 7–12
William "Doc" Key had a connection to animals since he was a child. While growing up as a slave in Tennesee, Doc was sent to plantations around to state to care for sick animals. When Doc was freed after the Civil War, he dreamed of breeding a winning race horse, but his colt was born weak. Instead of euthanzing the colt, Doc nursed the sickly colt back to health and named him Jim. Doc taught Jim to recognize letters and to count. The two traveled around the country, telling the story of how kindness saved Jim and brought them both happiness.

Six DotsSix Dots: A Story of Young Louis Braille
by Jen Bryant, Boris Kulikov
Ages 4–8
After an accident left Louis Braille blind, he was sent to Paris at the age of 10 to study at the Royal School for the Blind. Louis was disheartend to discover that each word in the books for the blind was as big as his hand, and a sentence took up half a page, making each book enormous and very expensive. Louis was determined to come up with a more efficient method, eventually adapting a military coding technique. This engaging biography emphacizes Braille’s creativity rather than his disability.

My First Baby SignsMy First Baby Signs
by Phil Conigliaro and Tae Won Yu
Birth–2
By about six months of age babies know what they want, but dont have the words yet. Pull tabs in this clever book animate the hands of eight babies to demonstrate essential American Sign Language words: milk, eat, more, all done, thank you, help, bath, bed. Parents and preverbal babies will enjoy exploring this interative and useful book together.

UndercoverUndercover: One of These Things is Almost Like The Others
by Bastien Contraire
Ages 3–6
In this clever book, 64 collections of similar objects rendered in green and fuschia challenge the reader to select the different object hiding in plain sight. Young readers will enjoy closely examining the spreads to find the one thing that does not fit (an egg hiding among a page of birds, an airplane hidden among insects). This wordless book will encourage conversation about form and classification.

The Legend of Rock Paper ScissorsThe Legend of Rock Paper Scissors
by Drew Daywalt, Adam Rex
Ages 4–8
Rock is the champion of the Kingdom of Backyard, squishing all challengers, Paper has defeated everyone in Mom’s Home Office, and Scissors rules the Kitchen Realm. Seeking a new challenge, the three meet up in the garage, but after three exciting rounds they realize they are evenly matched. Expressive fonts and dramatic battle scenes accompany the hilarious text, perfect for sharing and revisiting.

The Rooster Who Would Not Be QuietThe Rooster Who Would Not Be Quiet!
by Carmen Agra Deedy, Eugene Yelchin
Ages 4–8
La Pz is a happy and very noisy village until Don Pepe is elected major and guarantees peace and quiet. Soon singing is illegal and even teakettles are afraid to whistle. After seven years of quiet, a cocky gallito and his family move into the village. The rooster refuses to stop crowing and Don Pepe imprisons him in a cage and threatens him with starvation. The rooster sings a hungrier song, but keeps crowing. The villages organize a non-violent but very noisy protest to save the noisy bird.

AntoinetteAntoinette
by Kelly DiPucchio, Christian Robinson
Ages 4–8
Antoinette is the only French poodle in a family of French bulldogs. Her brothers are clever, fast, and strong, and Antoinette feels outclassed. Her mother reassures Antoinette that she has an extra-special talent waiting to be discovered. Antoinette’s friend Gaston, the only French bulldog in a family of French poodles, asks her to help look for his missing sister Ooh-La-La. Antoinette discovers that she has an extra-special sense of smell, and tracks the missing puppy to the Louvre. (sequel to Gaston)

Du Iz Talk?Du Iz Tak?
by Carson Ellis
Ages 4–8
Two dragonflies discover a small plant emerging from the ground, and exclaim, “Du is tak?” As the plant grows they buld a fort and marvel at the huge flower it produces, discussing it in insect language. Detailed illustrations portray the instects’ formal outfits and eyeglasses, and portraythe passage of time through the metamorphisis of a caterpillar.

Old dog Baby BabyOld Dog Baby Baby
by Julie Fogliano, Chris Raschka
Ages 2–6
The old dog would prefer to sleep in the sun on the kitchen floor, but the little baby crawls in and disturbs his peace. Finally the two settle down for a nap together as an older sibling looks at photos of the old dog as a young puppy, a subtle comment on the inevitability of the passage of time.

CityBlockCityblock
by Christopher Franceschelli, Peskimo
Ages 3–5
A grandfather and two children explore the city using various transportation modes. Clever die cuts in this interactive board book encourage young readers to guess what is hidden: a pair of chopsticks reveals a Japanese restaurant, a soccer ball opens to a stadium.

How To Say GoodbyeBenny and Penny in How To Say Goodbye
by Geoffrey Hayes
Ages 4–8
When Penny the mouse finds a dead salamander she is very upset, but her brother Benny is disgusted and throws it into a bush. Penny retrieves the body, names it Little Red, and begins planning a funeral with her friends Melina the mole. Eventually Benny admits that he is also sad about the death of the little amphibian. This TOON Level 2 graphic novel presents feelings about death with sympathy and humor.

Real CowboysReal Cowboys
by Kate Hoefler, Jonathan Bean
Ages 4–7
This engaging picture book presents a much more diverse look at cowboys than the classic group of rough, tough men. The cowboys (and cowgirls) are a mix of races, have to be good listeners, are good communicators, are sensitive to the needs of their horses and cattle, and are often homesick.

All Ears, All EyesAll Ears, All Eyes
by Richard Jackson, Katherine Tillotson
Ages 4–8
This quiet book visits the forest at twilight, encouraging the use of ears and eyes to identify the forest creatures. The full moon helps to illuminate night creatures like bats, owls, and porcupines. Short lines featuring onomatopoeia encourage curiosity and quiet observation.

A Small thing But BigA Small Thing… but Big
by Tony Johnston, Hadley Hooper
Ages 4–7
Lizzie is terrified of dogs. One day while in the park with her mother she encounters a man walking his dog Cecile. The man gently responds to her timid questions and encourages her to pat Cecile. This small act is a big step for Lizzie, and she gradually takes makes other small but brave acts until she is finally walking Cecile by her herself.

Things To DoThings to Do
by Elaine Magliaro, Catia Chien
Ages 3–5
Whimsical poems in the form of To Do lists from various perspectives beg to be read aloud and shared. Dawn’s list begins with “Shoo away night,” the bee’s with “Flit among flowers,” the cricket’s with “Rub wings and sing,” the moon’s with “Hang in the darkness.”

TEKTek: The Modern Cave Boy
by Patrick McDonnell
Ages 4–8
Tek is a cave boy back in the time of the dinosaurs. Though his father hasn’t discovered fire yet, he has invented the Internet, and Tek spends every waking hour glued to his phone, tablet, and his game box. Tek’s obcession causes him to miss the Ice Age sledding and snowball fights the other children enjoy. He doesn’t even know the names of the dinosaurs. Finally a volcanic erruption breaks him out of his digital isolation. The book is the size and shape of an iPad with a rapidly depleteing battery indicator, underscoring the tounge-in-cheek tech addiction message.

Let’s Clap, Sing, ShoutLet’s Clap, Jump, Sing & Shout; Dance, Spin & Turn It Out!: Games, Songs, and Stories from an African American Childhood
by Patricia C. McKissack, Brian Pinkney
Ages 5–18
This songbook, storybook, and poetry collection is meant to be shared. Hand clap, jump rope, and circle games encourage partner and group movement. Songs are meant to be sung as a family, while the stories and poems beg to be read aloud. Parents and grandparents will love sharing this book with the children in their lives, while older children will appreciate the comprehensive recording of oral traditions.

The Way Home in the NightThe Way Home in the Night
by Akiko Miyakoshi
Ages 3–7
A mother rabbit carries her baby home through the dark quiet streets. The baby bunny explains that most of their neighbors are already home, and enjoys figuring out what they are doing by smelling (baking a pie) and listening (talking on the phone). At home the father rabbit tucks the bunny into bed, still wondering what the neighbors are doing.

Monkey with a Tool BeltMonkey with a Tool Belt and the Maniac Muffins
by Chris Monroe
Ages 4–8
Chico Bon Bon, the monkey with a tool belt, is trying to cope with the kitchen disasters created by his friend Clark the elephant. Clark’s secret ingredient muffins results in a explosion that shoots muffins all ofer the room, and then a giant pancake crushes the kitchen table. Luckily Chico Bon Bon has the engineering talent to deal with every crisis in this very funny 4th in the series.

A Voyage in the CloudsA Voyage in the Clouds: The (Mostly) True Story of the First International Flight by Balloon in 1785
by Matthew Olshan, Sophie Blackall
Ages 4–8
Since the first manned balloon flight in 1783, an Italian, a Scot, woman, and a sheep have flown, but no one has yet flown a balloon from one country to another. On January 7, 1785, John Jeffries, an Englishman, and his pilot, Jean-Pierre Blanchard, a Frenchman, set off in their balloon to cross the English Channel to France. Jeffries drops the wrench overboard while adjsting the air valve, and they suddenly have no way to keep the rest of the air from escaping. They toss everything overboard, even their clothes, until finally coming up with a clever solution.

Before MorningBefore Morning
by Joyce Sidman, Beth Krommes
Ages 4–7
A small girl wishes for a blizzard so big that everyone will have to stay home, especially her mother who is an airline pilot. She and her father say goodbye and her mother sets of just as a light snow begins to fall, returning home when the airport is closed, to the joy of her family. This heartfelt long poem is beautifully illustrated.

The hawk of the CastleThe Hawk of the Castle: A Story of Medieval Falconry
by Danna Smith, Bagram Ibatoulline
Ages 4–8
The daughter of a castle falconer describes a training flight with their goshawk. Rhymic prose and beaitufully detailed pictures tell the story of the preparation and equipment needed, culminating in a thrilling depmonstration of the hawk’s hunting skill.

The Princess and the WarrierThe Princess and the Warrior: A Tale of Two Volcanoes
by Duncan Tonatiuh
Ages 6–9
Aztec Princess Izta had many wealthy men who wanted to become her husband and eventually emperor, but Izta fell in love with Popoca, a humble warrior who loved her for herself. Her father promised Izta that if Popoca could defeat their enemy Jaguar Claw, they could marry. An enemy brought a message that Popoca had been killed, and Izta fell into a deep sleep and could not be awakened, even by Popoca when he returned in triumph. But Popoca kept his promise never to leave her side, and even today two volcanoes guard Mexico City: the sleeping Iztaccíhuatl and Popocatépetl who tries to wake her wth smoke and ash.

PandoraPandora
by Victoria Turnbull
Ages 4–7
Pandora is a lonely fox who lives all alone in a house built on top of a rubish heap of old furniture and discarded toys. One day a bird with a broken wing falls from the sky. Pandora builds a nest and cares for the bird until it can fly again. The bird brings her gifts of twigs and flowers, but one day does not return. Pandora is lonely again until the nest begins to grow into a fabulous garden to cheer her up until the bird returns.

Fiona’s Little LieFiona’s Little Lie
by Rosemary Wells
Ages 5–8
Fiona eagerly volunteers to be the Birthday Elf for her best friend Felix and bring cupcakes to celebrate. On the way home she finds a caterpillar and forgets all about her task. When she realizes the next day at school that she doesn’t have the cupcakes, Fiona makes up a story about three alligator cupcake thieves. When forced to confront the alleged thieves, Fiona is consumed by guilt and finally tells the truth. Luckily her mother saves the day by arriving with cupcakes for all.

Henry & LeoHenry & Leo
by Pamela Zagarenski
Ages 4–7
To Henry, Leo isn’t a stuffed fox toy, instead he is his best friend and as real as the moon and the stars. When the two become separated, no one in Henry’s family believes Leo can find his way home, but Henry has faith that his beloved fox will come back to him.

New Books for Older Kids

The Inconceivable Life of QuinnThe Inconceivable Life of Quinn
by Marianna Baer
Ages 13–up
Quinn Cutler (16) is the daughter of a candidate for US Congress. Quinn has no memory of ever having sex, and is shocked to discover she is pregnant. When word gets out that she is both pregnant and claiming to be a virgin, devout pilgrims begin appearing at their Brooklyn home, hoping to witness the birth of the next messiah.

Balcony on the MoonBalcony on the Moon: Coming of Age in Palestine
by Ibtisam Barakat
Ages 12–up
This memoir, beginning in 1972, continues the story begun in Tasting the Sky: A Palestinian Childhood. As a high school student, Ibtisam accepts that she cannot do anything about the wars that surround her, instead concentrating on her schoolwork. Her mother admits that giving up her own education for marriage felt “worse than death” and works on completing her own high school education. The book is divided into five parts, each set in one of the family’s five homes, ending in 1981. As she matures Ibtisam becomes more aware of her parents’ marriage and gender restrictions, becoming determined not to live her mother’s restricted life.

Useless BayUseless Bay
by M.J. Beaufrand
Ages 13–up
The Gray quintuplets live on Whitby Island,Washington. Pixie has a reputatation for finding things with the help of her bloodhound Patience and her four brothers. When 10-year-old Grant Shepherd, the younger brother of Pixie’s friend Henry, goes missing, his millionaire father is frantic and asks the Gray quintuplets for help. Pixie discovers the body of Henry’s stepmother and suspects that something very sinister is going on. This atmoshpheric thriller includes a touch of the supernatural.

PathfindersPathfinders: The Journeys of 16 Extraordinary Black Souls
by Tonya Bolden
Ages 10–14
The 16 short biographical stories are presented in chronological order, beginning with Venture Smith, the son of a West Aftican prince who was sold into slavery, freed himself and his family, and fought in the Revolutionary War. Other little known American men and women of African descent include soprano Sissieretta Jones, banker Maggie Lena Walker, WWI fighter pilot Eugene Bullard, and mathematician and NASA researcher Kathering Coleman Goble Johnson.

Step Right UpStep Right Up: How Doc and Jim Key Taught the World about Kindness
by Donna Janell Bowman, Daniel Minter
Ages 7–12
William "Doc" Key had a connection to animals since he was a child. While growing up as a slave in Tennesee, Doc was sent to plantations around to state to care for sick animals. When Doc was freed after the Civil War, he dreamed of breeding a winning race horse, but his colt was born weak. Instead of euthanzing the colt, Doc nursed the sickly colt back to health and named him Jim. Doc taught Jim to recognize letters and to count. The two traveled around the country, telling the story of how kindness saved Jim and brought them both happiness.

To Stay AliveTo Stay Alive: Mary Ann Graves and the Tragic Journey of the Donner Party
by Skila Brown
Ages 10–14
This compelling novel in verse is written from the fictionalized perspective of real-life Mary Ann Graves, one of the few survivors of the Donnor Party. In 1846, Mary and her family left Illinois to settle in California. At first Mary shares her father’s excitment about the adventure, but the reality of life on the trail is not what she expected. Mary cares for her younger siblings, helps move rocks and trees blocking the wagons, and endures thirst in the desert. The worst is the final ordeal when they become trapped in the ice and snow at Donnor Pass, resorting to cannibalism in order to survive.

Garvey’s ChoiceGarvey’s Choice
by Nikki Grimes
Ages 8–12
Garveys father wants him to excell in sports, but Garvey dislikes athletics, preferring astronomy and reading science fiction. Feeling that he has failed his father, Garvey comforts himself by eating and is teased for being overweight. But Garvey is smart, funny, and kind and has two good friends, who encourage him to join the school chorus. Garvey excells at singing, and finds a different avenue to connect to his father. This engaging novel about being true to oneself is told in tanka verse.

AllegedlyAllegedly
by Tiffany D. Jackson
Ages 14–up
Mary Addison, a black 15-year-old from Brooklyn, was convicted of killing Alyssa, a white baby she was babysitting at the age of nine. After six years in “baby jail” Mary has been released to a group home. Quiet and bright, Mary is targeted by the other girls, finding solace in her volunteer work at a nursing home and her secret meetings with Ted, a fellow volunteer living at another group home. When Mary becomes pregnant she is told she cannot keep the baby because of her history, and declares she did not kill Alyssa. Interspersed police interviews with 9-year-old Mary expose issues of race, age, and mental illness.

FoxheartFoxheart
by Claire Legrand, Jaime Zollars
Ages 8–12
Quicksilver (12) is an orphan who lives as a thief in Willow-on-the-River. With her faithful dog Fox, she meets Sly Boots, a shy boy who lets them sleep in his attic when its too cold on the rooftops. One day Quicksliver discovers that she can do magic, which is forbidden. Anatazia, a mysterious old woman who may be a witch, transports them into the pastwhen they take on the task of protecting the witches.

Soldier SongSoldier Song: A True Story of the Civil War
by Debbie Levy, Gilbert Ford
Ages 8–10
Two years into the Civil War the Union army has just been defeated in the battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia, and retreats across the river. Entrenched for the winter, songs floating across the water create a temporary connection. Interspersed excerpts from the letters soldiers wrote home add a personal poinancy, hightlighted by a final exchange of “Home, Sweet Home” sung by homesick soldiers on both sides of the river.

When the Sea Turned to SilverWhen the Sea Turned to Silver
by Grace Lin
Ages 8–12
The Tiger Emperor is forcing all the men of the mountain villages to build the vast wall surrounding their kingdom. At Pinmei’s village, the emperor’s soldiers also take her grandmother, the Storyteller. To save her, Pinmei and her friend Yishan set out to find the Luminous Stone That Lights the Night, the only thing the emperor values more. This beautifully illustrated retelling of the Chinese folktale is very exciting.

Let’s Clap, Sing, ShoutLet’s Clap, Jump, Sing & Shout; Dance, Spin & Turn It Out!: Games, Songs, and Stories from an African American Childhood
by Patricia C. McKissack, Brian Pinkney
Ages 5–18
This songbook, storybook, and poetry collection is meant to be shared. Hand clap, jump rope, and circle games encourage partner and group movement. Songs are meant to be sung as a family, while the stories and poems beg to be read aloud. Parents and grandparents will love sharing this book with the children in their lives, while older children will appreciate the comprehensive recording of oral traditions.

ImpyriumImpyrium
by Henry H. Neff
Ages 8–12
The Faeregine dynasty has ruled Impyrium for 3,000 years, since they defeated the demon Astaroth, but the family’s magic is fading. Hazel Faeregine (12), the albino youngest of the triplet sisters who are heirs to the throne, is looked down on by her family who aren’t aware of her powers. The exception is her grandmother, the Empress, who plans to exploit Hazel in order to revitalize the family. Hob, a commoner from the northern wastelands, is sent to serve the Faeregines, and to spy on them. Hob and Hazel form an unexpected friendship in this exciting first in the Impyrium series.

Flying LessonsFlying Lessons & Other Stories
edited by Ellen Oh
Ages 8–12
The ten stories in this diverse collection from We Need Diverse Books are intented to appeal to “all of us.” The stoties by Kwame Alexander, Kelly J. Baptist, Soman Chainani, Matt de la Peña, Tim Federle, Grace Lin, Meg Medina, Walter Dean Myers, Tim Tingle, and Jacqueline Woodson range form the humorous to the heartfelt, and highlight the importance of perspective, perservance, courage, and creativity during the middle school years.

Rani Patel in Full EffectRani Patel In Full Effect
by Sonia Patel
Ages 12–up
It’s 1991 and Rani Patel (16) lives on the tiny Hawaiian island of Moloka’i with her Gujarati immigrant parents. In Gujarati culture “the husband is God,” and her parents arranged marriage brings neither of them happiness. Rani’s father dependes on her for all his needs, including intimate ones, until Rani discovers he is having an affair with a girl barely older than she is. Rani shaves off her hair, as Gujarati widows do, and catches the attention of Mark, a man near her father’s age, who introduces Rani to 4eva Flowin’, an underground hip-hop movement that encourages her to make bad choices. But Rani’s unexcpected success as a hip-hop performer restores her confidence which allows her to reconnect to her mother.

GlitterGlitter
by Aprilynne Pike
Ages 14–up
Danica Grayson (17) lives in Sonoman-Versailes in the 22nd century. Inside the palace of Versailles everyone eats and dresses as if it’s the 18th century, with the addition of robots overseen by an onmipersenent AI to make life easier. Danica wintesses the king (19) committing murder, and her mother blackmails him into marrying Dani as soon as she turns 18 in six months. Dani has no intention of marrying the cruel king, and turns to selling Glitter, a drug so powerful a tiny pinch cause instant addiction, to raise the money she needs to escape.

BeastBeast
by Brie Spangler
Ages 12–up
Dylan (15) is already over six feet tall and very very hairy. He is a good student and supports his widowed mother, but is mocked by his classmates, who call him The Beast. Dylan tries to hide his ugly face behind a hat and long hair and is horrified when his school bans hats. He falls off the roof and breaks his leg, ending up in a therapy class for self-harmers, where he doesn’t pay much attention, missing Jamie’s statement that she is transgender. A talented photographer, Jamie likes Dylan for the person he is, but their romance is endangered when he learns the truth Jamie thought he already knew.

The Warden’s DaughterThe Warden’s Daughter
by Jerry Spinelli
Ages 9–12
Cammie (12) is the daughter of a prison warden in 1950s Two Mills, Pennyslvania. Cammie’s mother died saving Cammie’s life when she was just a baby, and she lives a lonely life living with her father above the town prison. During the summer she fills the hours visiting the women inmates, plays records with her best friend, and trying to transform the prison housekeeper into a mother-figure. Cammie’s unresolved grief and guilt over the sacrifice her mother made cause her to lash out at everyone when Boo Boo Dunbar, one of the few African-American prisoners, commits suicide.

The Singing BonesThe Singing Bones
by Shaun Tan
Ages 12–up
Artist Shaun Tan captures the sprit of seventy-five Grimms’ fairy tales in haunting sculptures. A short excrpt from the fairy tale appears on the left hand page, while a photgraph of the sculpture appears on the right, embodying the essense of the tale.

The Princess and the WarrierThe Princess and the Warrior: A Tale of Two Volcanoes
by Duncan Tonatiuh
Ages 6–9
Aztec Princess Izta had many wealthy men who wanted to become her husband and eventually emperor, but Izta fell in love with Popoca, a humble warrior who loved her for herself. Her father promised Izta that if Popoca could defeat their enemy Jaguar Claw, they could marry. An enemy brought a message that Popoca had been killed, and Izta fell into a deep sleep and could not be awakened, even by Popoca when he returned in triumph. But Popoca kept his promise never to leave her side, and even today two volcanoes guard Mexico City: the sleeping Iztaccíhuatl and Popocatépetl who tries to wake her wth smoke and ash.

Gem & DixieGem & Dixie
by Sara Zarr
Ages 14–up
Gem (17) has been taking care of her younger sister Dixie as long as she can remember. Their mother spends the little money she earns on drugs, and her untrustworthy father has been absent most of their lives. Over the years the two sisters have grown apart: Gem is a loner, while Dixie cultivates friends and popularity. When their father unexpectedly reappears and hides a bag of money in their apartment, Gem convinces Dixie to run away first to hotels and then a nearby island. During the three days in Seattle and beyond, Gem is forced to make some hard choices.