Bookworm  
Bookworm for Kids

   
These new books are highly recommended for home and school libraries.

New Books for Younger Kids

Harry Miller’s RunHarry Miller’s Run
by David Almond, Salvatore Rubbino
Ages 7–9
Liam wants to go out running with his friends, training for Junior Great North Run, but his mother asks him to help old Harry clean out his house instead. Harry tells Liam about the time he and two friends ran all the way from South Shields to Newcastle, a thirteen mile journey to the sea. Old photographs help Harry tell the tale of his run and the girl he loved. Young readers may need help with the working-class British dialect, but Harry’s passion for life needs no translation.

The Steadfast Tin SoldierThe Steadfast Tin Soldier
by Hans Christian Anderson, JooHee Yoon
Ages 6–9
The steadfast tin soldier has only one leg and cannot stand as well as the other soldiers. He falls in love with a paper ballerina and incurs the wrath of a frightening jack-in-the-box troll. Falling from the window, the soldier is eventually swallowed by a fish. Mixed-media illustrations accompany this retelling of the tragic fairy tale.

The Pied Piper of HamelinThe Pied Piper of Hamelin
by Thomas Baas
Ages 6–9
Set in northern Germany near Christmas of 1283, the town is ready to celebrate when a horde of rats arrives. The mayor offers 1000 gold coins for ridding the town of rats, and a stranger with a small pipe charms them outside the town gates. The mayor refused to pay the reward, and the stranger pipes the children away as well. Vibrant illustrations accompany this retelling of the classic legend.

Rivers of SunlightRivers of Sunlight: How the Sun Moves Water Around the Earth
by Molly Bang, Penny Chisholm
Ages 4–8
Speaking directly to the reader, the Sun explains that the water on Earth is constantly in motion and reveals the role the sun takes in heating and cooling water, keeping the ocean currents in motion, and drawing fresh water out of the ocean. (part of the Sunlight Series that explores our planet’s delicate geological cycles)

Priscilla GorillaPriscilla Gorilla
by Barbara Bottner, Michael Emberley
Ages 4–7
Priscilla (6) is obsessed with gorillas. She loves everything about them, especially that they always get their way. She dances like a gorilla, eats like a gorilla, and wears her gorilla pajamas as often as she can. Her teacher asks the class to do reports on their favorite animals, and Priscilla is delighted to give her report in costume. Unfortunately she beats her chest and dances around when it’s not her turn, ending up in the Thinking Corner. The rest of the class decides being gorillas is great fun, and the Thinking Corner is soon very crowded.

Grand CanyonGrand Canyon
by Jason Chin
Ages 7–12
A girl and her father take a day-long hike out of the Grand Canyon. As they move through each rock layer, the girl makes a discovery through a die cut hole that transports her back into the past upon turning the page. This intriguing book provides information about the ecology, geology and anthropology of the Grand Canyon in an engaging way.

Dad and the DinosaurDad and the Dinosaur
by Gennifer Choldenko, Dan Santat
Ages 5–8
Big Nick doesn’t seem to be afraid of anything, but his son Nicholas is afraid of everything, especially the dark, the bushes where the giant bugs live, and the underside of manhole covers. The small plastic dinosaur he carries in his pocket gives him the courage to face his fears, helping him to swim in deep water, climb tall walls, and face the huge goalie nicknamed Gorilla. When Nicholas loses his dinosaur, his father takes him on a nighttime quest to find it, reassuring Nicholas that its OK to get help facing your fears, all guys do.

The Bossier BabyThe Bossier Baby
by Marla Frazee
Ages 3–8
The Boss Baby is in for a shock when his new sister comes home from the hospital. Clad in a black onsie with chewable pearls and carrying an Etch-a-Sketch like a computer tablet, the Bossier Baby is even more demanding than her older brother, who has been demoted from Boss Baby to Staff.

This House, OnceThis House, Once
by Deborah Freedman
Ages 4–8
This thought-provoking book suggests that a house can remember the origin of each element it is composed of: the giant oak of the door, the stones of th foundation. Inside the house, readers are invited to speculate on the origin of doorknobs and bookshelves, and to think about the ways their own homes are extensions of the natural world.

TonyTony
by Ed Galing, Erin E. Stead
Ages 3–6
In the days before delivery trucks, milk and eggs were delivered to American homes by horse and wagon. Poet Ed Galing pays homage to the horse he loved as a boy, waking up at 3:00 AM every morning to say hello to Tony when he brought the milk.

Little Fox in the ForestLittle Fox in the Forest
by Stephanie Graegin
Ages 4–8
A young girl brings her most treasured possession, a stuffed fox, to school to share. When she sets it down on the playground, a real fox snatches it up and runs off into the woods. The girl and her friend chase after the fox, but soon lose sight of it. They ask the animals in the forest for help, and eventually find the fox. This wordless picture books leads us from the dull blue-gray reality of the children to the full color world of the forest inhabitants.

Goodnight EveryoneGoodnight Everyone
by Chris Haughton
Ages 2–5
The sun is setting in the forest, and as the background gradually darken, four little mice, three hares, and two deer sigh, yawn, and fall asleep while Great Big Bear tries to get Little Bear to fall asleep. Sleepy readers then say goodnight to each animal family, sleeping peacefully in its home.

Alphonse, That Is Not OK to Do!Alphonse, That Is Not OK to Do!
by Daisy Hirst
Ages 2–5
Natalie was an only monster until little Alphonse came along. That’s mostly OK but sometimes having a little brother is challenging. Especially when he does things like eating her favorite book. Natalie lets her frustration out with a fearsome drawing with a tornado and s swarm of peas pursuing Alphonse. While bathing she hears sounds that make her fear her drawing has come to life, but it’s only Alphonse, who has altered her drawing with humor.

Good Morning, CityGood Morning, City
by Pat Kiernan, Pascal Campion
Ages 2–6
While most city residents are still sleeping, early risers are hard at work baking bread, collecting garbage, delivering papers, and preparing for the morning TV news. Then bus drivers pick up passengers, a construction crew begins work, and a little girl and her family begin their day.

A Sea VoyageA Sea Voyage
by Gérard Lo Monaco
Ages 4–8
Six three-dimensional sea vessels are featured in this elegant pop-up book, including an ocean liner, tall ship, caravel, and lifeboat. The accompanying rhyming text is reminiscent of sea chanteys. Background details about each boat are included.

Frederick DouglassFrederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History
by Walter Dean Myers, Floyd Cooper
Ages 4–8
This accessible biography draws on Frederick Douglass’s own words to present his story from a slave child who dared to dream of a life of freedom, his determination to become educated, his leading role in the abolitionist movement, and his life as a writer, speaker, and social reformer.

WordsWords
by Christoph Niemann
Ages 4–8
Over 300 words are presented with illustrations drawn with bold black lines: opposites, compound words, simple directions, and a few like lollygag added for fun. This engaging exploration of words and language encourages multiple readings.

Mighty Mighty Construction SiteMighty, Mighty Construction Site
by Sherri Duskey Rinker, Tom Lichtenheld
Ages 2–4
A wide variety of trucks gather at a construction site. The job is challenging, so the call for help goes out, and reinforcements arrive. By working together the trucks can accomplish far more than they can do alone.

A Poem for PeterA Poem for Peter: The Story of Ezra Jack Keats and the Creation of The Snowy Day
by Andrea Davis Pinkney, Steve Johnson, Lou Fancher
Ages 7–10
Ezra Jack Keats was born in Brooklyn, New York, to Polish immigrant parents. Ezra’s father felt his dream of becoming an artist was unrealistic, but Ezra was determined. He won prizes in high school, and created art for the WPA and Marvel comics, dreaming of the time he could write and illustrate his own book. A photo of an African American child led to The Snowy Day, the first mainstream book to feature an African American child, and a Caldecott medal winner.

Squirrels Leap, Squirrels SleepSquirrels Leap, Squirrels Sleep
by April Pulley Sayre, Steve Jenkins
Ages 4–8
Four types of squirrels are introduced through rhyming text and realistic illustration. The active squirrels of all types busily explore their world, gather food, and even fly. Back matter presents more information about the different squirrels.

Bob, Not Bob!Bob, Not Bob!
by Liz Garton Scanlon, Audrey Vernick, Matthew Cordell
Ages 4–8
Little Louie is sick in bed with a terrible cold. His nose is clogged, his ears are cracking, and he needs his mom. Unfortunately, when he calls out for “Mom” his stuffy nose makes it sound like “Bob” and the family dog comes running, drooling all over Louie and his bed. Funny illustration capture the mess of a sickroom, and kids will love hearing Louie’s mangled language as this book is read aloud.

The Land of NodThe Land of Nod
by Robert Louis Stevenson, Robert Hunter
Ages 3–7
Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic 1885 poem is given new life by vivid illustrations in a palette of pinks and blues. A crutch in the corner hints at the reason the boy is stuck inside while the other children play outdoors, but he can move freely in The Land of Nod, where his everyday objects come to life.

The Barefoot Book of ChildrenThe Barefoot Book of Children
by Tessa Strickland, Kate Depalma, David Dean
Ages 3–8
This inclusive book invites children to consider the similarities and differences of children around the world, depicting diversity while highlighting our interconnectedness, celebrating individuality while recognizing the rewards of community.

The Cat from Hunger MountainThe Cat From Hunger Mountain
by Ed Young
Ages 4–8
Lord Cat has a good life at the top of his mountain, with a fine house, attentive servants, workers to tend the fields, and plenty of rice to eat. Lord Cat is careless of his luck, throwing away food not up to his standards. Then a drought brings crop failure, and the villagers leave to find a better life elsewhere. Lord Cat remains alone with all his wealth until hunger drives him from the mountaintop to beg for food from a monk who feeds those in need. From the monk, Lord Cat learns what happened to all the food he considered not worthy.

The Nian MonsterThe Nian Monster
by Andrea Wang, Alina Chau
Ages 4–8
In Shanghai, Xingling is hanging red paper decorations for Chinese New Year with her grandmother, who tells her about the Nian Monster who once devoured whole villages. Since the Nian Monster is afraid of loud sound and the color red, firecrackers and the decorations keep the monster at bay. But while Xingling is cooking, the monster leaps onto the balcony, threatening to devour the city. Quick-witted Xingling offers him food until the fireworks are ready to scare him away.

New Books for Older Kids

Harry Miller’s RunHarry Miller’s Run
by David Almond, Salvatore Rubbino
Ages 7–9
Liam wants to go out running with his friends, training for Junior Great North Run, but his mother asks him to help old Harry clean out his house instead. Harry tells Liam about the time he and two friends ran all the way from South Shields to Newcastle, a thirteen mile journey to the sea. Old photographs help Harry tell the tale of his run and the girl he loved. Young readers may need help with the working-class British dialect, but Harry’s passion for life needs no translation.

The Steadfast Tin SoldierThe Steadfast Tin Soldier
by Hans Christian Anderson, JooHee Yoon
Ages 6–9
The steadfast tin soldier has only one leg and cannot stand as well as the other soldiers. He falls in love with a paper ballerina and incurs the wrath of a frightening jack-in-the-box troll. Falling from the window, the soldier is eventually swallowed by a fish. Mixed-media illustrations accompany this retelling of the tragic fairy tale.

YvainYvain: The Knight of the Lion
by M.T. Anderson, Andrea Offermann
Ages 12–up
This compelling graphic novel tells the story of Sir Yvain, a knight at King Arthur’s court, who defeats a local lord in battle and becomes involved with Lady Laudine, the beautiful widow, and her sly maid Lunette. Based on a 12th century epic poem by Chrétien de Troyes, this modern version sheds light on the plight of medieval women, often influenced by the actions of others, like the oblivious Yvain.

City of Saints & thievesCity of Saints & Thieves
by Natalie C. Anderson
Ages 12–up
Tina and her mother are refugees from the Congo. In Sangui City her mother finds work as a maid in the home of Roland Greyhill, a prominent businessman whose fortune was made from a life of corruption and crime. When her mother is murdered, Tina is sure Greyhill is responsible, but no one listens to the refugee girl. Homeless, she is recruited by the Goondas, a gang of orphans and street kids, and trained to become a thief. Four years later, Tina is closer to getting revenge for her mother’s death when she discovers she may not know all the facts.

The Pied Piper of HamelinThe Pied Piper of Hamelin
by Thomas Baas
Ages 6–9
Set in northern Germany near Christmas of 1283, the town is ready to celebrate when a horde of rats arrives. The mayor offers 1000 gold coins for ridding the town of rats, and a stranger with a small pipe charms them outside the town gates. The mayor refused to pay the reward, and the stranger pipes the children away as well. Vibrant illustrations accompany this retelling of the classic legend.

The March Against FearThe March Against Fear: The Last Great Walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the Emergence of Black Power
by Ann Bausum
Ages 12–up
In 1966 James Meredith organized a peaceful march for voter registration in Mississippi. Black rights leaders like leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. and Stokely Carmichael joined the march, an unlikely alliance that resulted in the Black Power movement. Beginning with Meredith’s assassination, this powerful book goes back in time to explain the events that led to the 200-mile walk, known as the March Against Fear, and its aftermath.

Saving HamletSaving Hamlet
by Molly Booth
Ages 12–up
Emma is excited about the start of her high school sophomore year. She has joined the drama club and is given the job of assistant stage manager for the production of Hamlet. But everything goes wrong very quickly: the soccer star playing Hamlet is terrible, her best friend stops talking to her, and she is suddenly promoted to stage manager despite having no experience at all. Then Emma falls through a trapdoor and comes out in the Globe Theater in 1601. With her short hair everyone, including Will Shakespeare, thinks she is a boy and she struggles to understand Elizabethan English while learning the job of backstage assistant in the premiere of Hamlet.

MerrowMerrow
by Ananda Braxton-Smith
Ages 14–up
Neen Marrey (12) has been raised by her aunt Ushag since she was a toddler, her father downed while out fishing, and her mother disappeared soon afterward. The villagers of Carrick whisper unkind speculations, but Neen, who loves the tales of blind fiddler Skully Slevin of merrow (mermaids), selkies, krakens, and changelings, secretly believes that her mother returned to her merrow family to live below the sea.

Grand CanyonGrand Canyon
by Jason Chin
Ages 7–12
A girl and her father take a day-long hike out of the Grand Canyon. As they move through each rock layer, the girl makes a discovery through a die cut hole that transports her back into the past upon turning the page. This intriguing book provides information about the ecology, geology and anthropology of the Grand Canyon in an engaging way.

Of Fire and StarsOf Fire and Stars
by Audrey Coulthurst, Jordan Saia
Ages 13–up
At the age of seven, Princess Dennaleia of Havemont discovers that she has a magical “affinity” for fire. Unfortunately, she is already betrothed to Prince Thandilimon of neighboring Mynaria, where the practice of magic is banned. Dennaleia’s mother believes that if she ignores her gift it will fade away, but her affinity grows stronger, and she almost causes a fire when she arrives in Mynaria at the age of 16. She tries to hide her affinity from the prince’s family, especially his prickly older sister Amaranthine, for whom she feels an unexpected attraction.

The Bone SparrowThe Bone Sparrow
by Zana Fraillon
Ages 9–12
Subhi’s mother and older sister were exiled from Burma with other Rohingya, the persecuted ethnic Muslim minority, to a detention center in Australia, where Subhi was born. Now ten, the refugee camp run by abusive guards is the only life Subhi has ever known. As his mother sinks deeper into depression, Subhi’s imagination helps him survive the injustice and boredom. One day a girl named Jimmie appears at the bars of the camp, holding a notebook written by her dead mother. Jimmie can’t read, and sneaks into the camp to listen to Subhi read her mother’s stories.

Here We AreHere We Are: Feminism for the Real World
by Kelly Jensen
Ages 14–up
This powerful yet accessible scrapbook style book presents reflections by 44 writers, dancers, actors, and artists on the topic of feminism. The contributions include essays, illustrations, playlists, comics, and poems from diverse perspectives, covering topics including gender identity, body image, creativity, mental illness, etc.

Honestly BenHonestly Ben
by Bill Konigsberg
Ages 14–up
Ben Carver (17) is having a tough year. He isn’t doing well in calculus, endangering his GPS and his chance of winning a scholarship. He is attracted to Hannah, a beautiful neighborhood girl. But the real trouble is that Ben is in love with his former best friend Rafe. Ben isn’t against gays, but as the son of a farmer and captain of the baseball team, he has trouble accepting that he is sexually attracted to a boy. This excellent exploration of modern relationships and the many forms of love is a companion to Openly Straight.

My Sister RosaMy Sister Rosa
by Justine Larbalestier
Ages 14–up
When Che Taylor (17) and his family move from Bangkok to New York City, his biggest concern is controlling his 10-year-old sister Rosa. Originally from Australia, the family has moved frequently because of work, and his parents are too busy to worry about Rosa’s behavior. Che loves his sister, and he is the only one she trusts, but he is sure she is a true psychopath — clever, manipulative, and very dangerous. He has been able to control her in the past, but the big city provides far too many opportunities for her “acting out” to cause real damage.

Daughter of the Pirate KingDaughter of the Pirate King
by Tricia Levenseller
Ages 13–up
Alosa (17) is sent on a secret mission to retrieve an ancient map to a legendary treasure by her father, an infamous pirate king. Alosa allows herself to be captured by a rival pirate gang, sure that her years of training and experience pirating will allow her to steal the map without being caught. But Riven, the very attractive first mate, is unexpectedly clever and may just be her match. This funny action adventure includes a bit of magic.

A Poem for PeterA Poem for Peter: The Story of Ezra Jack Keats and the Creation of The Snowy Day
by Andrea Davis Pinkney, Steve Johnson, Lou Fancher
Ages 7–10
Ezra Jack Keats was born in Brooklyn, New York, to Polish immigrant parents. Ezra’s father felt his dream of becoming an artist was unrealistic, but Ezra was determined. He won prizes in high school, and created art for the WPA and Marvel comics, dreaming of the time he could write and illustrate his own book. A photo of an African American child led to The Snowy Day, the first mainstream book to feature an African American child, and a Caldecott medal winner.

The Someday BirdsThe Someday Birds
by Sally J. Pla, Julie McLaughlin
Ages 8–12
Charles had a perfectly ordinary life until his father was injured while working as a journalist in Afghanistan. Charles feels safe at home in California, where his family accepts his ritualistic behaviors and fascination with birds, but when his father is sent to a hospital in Virginia to treat his brain injury, Charles is forced to leave his familiar environment. As he travels across the country with his boy-crazy older sister, his rambunctious twin brothers, under the supervision of a pink-haired woman from Sarajevo, he decides that if he can spot all the birds he and his father were hoping to see that everything will be OK.

When Morning ComesWhen Morning Comes
by Arushi Raina
Ages 14–up
Four teens from different backgrounds participate in the student uprising that began in Soweto, South Africa, on June 16, 1976. Zanele, an African student, secretly organizes the protest against the Afrikaans Medium Decree Act, which required native Africans to speak only English and Afrikaans in school. Thabo leads a local gang, extorting money from an Indian store owner whose daughter Meena is sympathetic to the students. Jack, a white Afrikaner, befriends Zanele. Each character feels pressure from their loved ones to conform to expectations, yet each feels that change is coming.

Florence NightingaleFlorence Nightingale: The Courageous Life of the Legendary Nurse
by Catherine Reef
Ages 12–up
This gripping biography puts Florence Nightingale’s ground-breaking work into context. Prior to her insistence on cleanliness, eight out of nine British soldier deaths in hospitals were due to disease rather than their wounds. Extensive use of primary sources reveal Nightingale’s complex character, her flaws as well as her virtues.

The Inexplcable Logic of My LifeThe Inexplicable Logic of My Life
by Benjamin Alire Saenz
Ages 12–up
High school senior Salvador Silva is devastated when his grandmother is diagnosed with cancer. When a classmate insults his adoptive gay father Sal unexpectedly becomes violent and punches him. Adopted at the age of three, Sal has the support of a loving Mexican-American family and two close friends, but still feels out of place. The unopened letter from his biological mother doesn’t help either. This compassionate coming of age novel explores themes of individuality and family.

The AmateursThe Amateurs
by Sara Shepard
Ages 14–up
It’s been five years since Helena Kelly was murdered, and her killer still hasn’t been caught. Younger sister Aerin, still consumed by grief, posts a request for help on the Case Not Closed (CNC) online forum that specializes in cold cases. Seneca Frazier (18) and Maddy Wright (19) answer, and join Aerin in the hunt for new evidence, uncovering secrets that Helena was concealing. (first in a new series)

The Harlem CharadeThe Harlem Charade
by Natasha Tarpley
Ages 8–12
Jin (12) helps her Korean grandparents run their corner store in Harlem, and is fascinated by Alex, an African-American girl who is ashamed of her family’s wealth and does secret good deeds. Jin orchestrates working with Alex on a school project, alone with Elvin, whose grandfather was recently attacked and is in a coma. The three join forces to figure out who attacked him, sharing Harlem landmarks and history with Elvin, who just moved from Berkeley, California.

Piecing Me TogetherPiecing Me Together
by Renée Watson
Ages 12–up
Jade Watson, and aspiring artist, lives with her mother in Portland, Oregon, and travels by bus as a scholarship student each day to a mostly white private school. Jade knows she must escape from her poor neighborhood if she is going to succeed, and is both grateful and resentful of the opportunities she is offered. The Women to Women mentorship is offered to “ at risk” girls, but Jade knows it is designed specifically for black girls from “bad” neighborhoods. Her college graduate mentor doesn’t understand Jade or her environment, and Jade knows she could teach the successful women some truths about how to make a difference. Collage illustrations accompany Jade’s narration about taking something ugly and making it beautiful.

Another CastleAnother Castle: Grimoire
by Andrew Wheeler
Ages 13–up
Princess Misty of Beldora isn’t happy with the prince her father has picked out for her and longs for a more exciting future. Getting kidnapped by Lord Badlug of Grimoire, the land of monsters, isn’t exactly what she had in mind. Badlug the Terrible is intent on conquering Beldora, and marrying its princess is part of his plot. Misty is determined to escape, but not until she has killed Badlug in revenge for murdering her mother. She gathers an eclectic band of allies, including her gorgon attendant Gorga and Frogmoth, a gay gargoyle whose ex-boyfriend is heir to the Grimoire throne. This graphic novel is a feminist fantasy adventure that challenges genre conventions.

VelocityVelocity
by Chris Wooding
Ages 12–up
Cassica is a fearless and determined driver; Shiara can repair anything and is good at racing strategies. Together the two are preparing for the highly competitive Widowmaker, a three-day race with the prize of a life of luxury aboard an orbital habitat. Desperate to escape from the tiny dying town of Coppermouth, the two are willing to accept the risk that they may be among the huge number of race cars that do not survive the ordeal. But as the race begins, and the two head off through the dangerous wasteland, the lure of fame and fortune may leave their friendship yet one more casualty of the race.

American StreetAmerican Street
by Ibi Zoboi
Ages 14–up
Fabiola Toussaint was born in America, but grew up in Port-Au-Prince, Haiti. Fabiola dreamed of moving back to America, where her aunt and cousins have an enviable live in Detroit. Arriving in New York City, her mother is detained by immigration for not having the correct documents, and Fabiola travels alone to Detroit. She is shocked by the rough urban environment, her loud cousins, and the physically abusive drug-dealing boyfriend of on of her cousins. She turns to her Haitian spirits, and a mysterious street man, for guidance, and brokers a deal with the police to set up the drug-dealer in exchange for her mother’s release. This intense book is based on the author’s own experiences as a Haitian immigrant in 1980s Brooklyn.